Gay Japanese Politician Supports Korean LGBT

Gay Japanese Politician Supports Korean LGBT

Like in most of Asia, LGBT equality is slow in coming. A combination of “traditional Confucian values and a powerful Christian community” has made the road very difficult for the LGBT community.

So, when Japan's first openly-gay politician, Taiga Ishikawa, 40, heard that Seoul's police banned the Korea Queer Culture (to take place in June 28), he took action, traveling to Korea in early June to support Korea's LGBT community and be part of the festival which is now being allowed to go forward “after a court ruled the ban unjust.”

Taiwan – 1st in Asia to Legalize Marriage Equality?

Taiwan – 1st in Asia to Legalize Marriage Equality?

Will Taiwan be the 1st Asian nation to legalize marriage equality? It seems that the US Supreme Court decision that legalized marriage equality in America is having ripple effects throughout the world. Even though the US was disappointingly behind 17 other countries in legalizing marriage equality, it nevertheless continues to be a trend-setter and the role model for other countries to follow. Leader of Taiwan's judiciary, Lo Ying-hsueh, said that the government will…

British Expatriate Asks Seoul Mayor for Gay Rights

British Expatriate Asks Seoul Mayor for Gay Rights

Simon Hunter-Williams, an English professor, who has lived in Korea for the last five years, wants to marry his Korean partner. The problem is, however, gay marriage is not legal in South Korea. While same-sex relationships are not illegal, they are still considered taboo in a country with a significant Christian population.

The Legal Status of Gays in Singapore

The Legal Status of Gays in Singapore

…the LGBT community in Singapore has long lived with the historical burden of British colonialism which instituted its laws reflecting strict Victorian values back in 1819. (Section 377A of the Singapore Penal Code criminalizes all sexual acts between men, even if private and consensual, and even though the prohibition on oral and anal sex between heterosexuals and between lesbians was repealed in 2007.)

Before then, it is fairly likely that Singapore, like most Asian/Malay cultures before colonialism, had been tolerant of sexual minorities. But with the imposition of ultra-conservative British values, Asians who wanted to assimilate and become “civilized,” eventually, over time, adopted strict British sexual moral values. To this day, a strong sense of social conservatism permeates much of Singaporean society. How long will gay Singaporeans have to wait for change?